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Understanding the Links Between Local Ecological Knowledge, Ecosystem Services, and Resilience to Climate Change in Pacific Islands

We are examining the ecological, economic and cultural outcomes for a variety of land and ocean uses in four study sites in the Pacific

UHERO’s Project Environment has received funding from the National Science Foundation to participate in an interdisciplinary, international project that spans the natural and social sciences as well as the terrestrial and marine spheres. UHERO is partnering with scientists, resource managers, cultural practitioners and private landowners in Hawai'i and Fiji to explores the effects of different management and climate change scenarios on ecosystem services and indicators of resilience in three Pacific island watersheds.   

We are in the process of conducting four in-depth case studies at the watershed level, focused on quantifying ecological, cultural, and economic values of various land/ocean uses and covers, and their implications for resilience to climate change. The four watersheds were chosen where collaborators have long-term studies to leverage strong existing relationships with landowners, resource managers and users. The watersheds include Ka'upulehu on the leeward coast of Hawai'i Island, Ha'ena on the north shore of Kaua'i, Pu'u Wa'awa'a on the leeward coast of Hawai'i Island, and Kubulau on southwestern Vanua Levu (Fiji).

We have also received funding to extend the developed NSF Coastal SEES framework  to more directly include food-energy-water (FEW) nexus considerations. FEW tradeoffs and synergies will be examined for the He'eia watershed on Oahu.

Supported by: National Science Foundation Award #OCE 1325824

 

REPORTS AND PRODUCTS

NAHELEHELE DRYLAND FOREST SYMPOSIUM KONA 2017

SOCIETY FOR CONSERVATION BIOLOGY FIJI 2014 CONFERENCE

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