1. Skip to navigation
  2. Skip to content
  3. Skip to sidebar

Products

Keep up to date with the latest UHERO products.

The Effect of Minimum Drinking Age Laws on Pregnancy, Fertility, and Alcohol Consumption

Analysis of micro-level data reveals that changes in the minimum legal drinking age (MLDA)could induce changes in the intensity and location of alcohol consumption, sexual behavior, and teen fertility. Effects on teen fertility vary across different populations. Among 15-20 year-old non-poor whites, less restrictive legal access to alcohol decreases the probability of first pregnancy and abortion. For this group, easier legal access to alcohol likely increases the alcohol consumption in bars. For black and poor white young women, the results are sensitive to the alcohol consumption restrictions measure. A decrease in the MLDA increases the probability of first pregnancy and abortion. Yet, using a more precise measure that accounts for the MLDA and the woman’s age, these results generally no longer hold.

Published version: Cintina, I. (2014) The Effect of Minimum Drinking Age Laws on Pregnancy, Fertility, and Alcohol Consumption. Review of Economics of the Household, doi 10.1007/s11150-014-9271-8

Working Paper


KITV Project Economy: Payroll Tax Cuts

Posted February 17, 2012 | Categories: Media

Mahealani Richardson interviews UHERO Executive Director and Associate Professor of Economics Carl Bonham.

  • What does the payroll tax mean for the economy?
  • Congress is also working on a deal in terms of the unemployment benefits extension. What does that mean for people here in the islands?
  • What's your view on the turmoil in Europe and how it affects the islands and the United States?

Watch Q / A


KITV Project Economy: First Quarter Report Released

Posted February 10, 2012 | Categories: Media

Jill Kuramoto interviews UHERO Forecast Project Director and Professor of Economics Byron Gangnes.

  • The forecast released this morning was titled "Some Improvement, After Disappointing 2011" - that's pretty straightforward. What were some of the disappointments, first of all?
  • What does it look like for 2012 now?
  • I know that there's a senate bill being heard today that is kind of the state's version of the stimulus bill - do you think that will help open up jobs?

WatchRead the Report


UHERO State Forecast Update: Some Improvement, After Disappointing 2011

Hawaii’s stop-start recovery continued in the fourth quarter. We are a bit more optimistic about prospects for 2012.

A summary of this forecast is available as a service to the public. For more detailed analysis, subscribe to UHERO's Forecast Project.

public summarysubscribe


Economic Analysis of the Proposed Rule to Prevent Arrival of New Genetic Strains of the Rust Fungus Puccinia psidii in Hawai‘i

Since its first documented introduction to Hawai‘i in 2005, the rust fungus P. psidii has already severely damaged Syzygium jambos (Indian rose apple) trees and the federallyendangered Eugenia koolauensis (nioi). Fortunately, the particular strain has yet to cause serious damage to ‘ōhi‘a, which comprises roughly 80% of the state’s native forests and covers 400,000 ha. Although the rust has affected less than 5% of Hawaii’s ‘ōhi‘a trees thus far, the introduction of more virulent strains and the genetic evolution of the current strain are still possible. Since the primary pathway of introduction is Myrtaceae plant material imported from outside the state, potential damage to ‘ohi‘a can be minimized by regulating those high-risk imports. We discuss the economic impact on the state’s florist, nursery, landscaping, and forest plantation industries of a proposed rule that would ban the import of non-seed Myrtaceae plant material and require a one-year quarantine of seeds. Our analysis suggests that the benefits to the forest plantation industry of a complete ban on non-seed material would likely outweigh the costs to other affected sectors, even without considering the reduction in risk to ‘ōhi‘a. Incorporating the value of ‘ōhi‘a protection would further increase the benefit-cost ratio in favor of an import ban.

Working Paper


KITV Project Economy: Employment On The Rise

Posted February 3, 2012 | Categories: Media

Jill Kuramoto interviews UHERO Executive Director and Associate Professor of Economics Carl Bonham.

  • The US Bureau of Labor Statistics released its monthly employment report this morning and reported another decrease in the US Unemployment rate?
  • We also saw a decline in the Unemployment rate to 8.3%, so this was a really good report?
  • As you know, we are focusing on Personal Finance this week. I know that is not the focus of UHERO, but can you give us any tips?

Watch Q / A


KITV Project Economy: More Fed Easing?

Posted January 27, 2012 | Categories: Media

Jill Kuramoto interviews UHERO Executive Director and Associate Professor of Economics Carl Bonham.

  • There was a large amount of economic news that came out this week - can you summarize?
  • What does the forecast mean?
  • Let's talk about unemployment numbers - why are Hawaii unemployment numbers rising as the rest of the nation's numbers fall?

Watch


KITV Project Economy: Will Tesoro Sale Effect Hawaii Gas Prices

Posted January 20, 2012 | Categories: Media

Mahealani Richardson interviews UHERO Research Fellow and Professor of Economics Sumner Lacroix.

  • Will this potential sale mean higher gas prices?
  • Tesoro is being very tight lipped as to why they are selling all these stations and the refinery. What is your opinion about it?
  • Do you think it's possible that Chevron may jump in?

Watch


Species Invasion as Catastrophe: The Case of the Brown Tree Snake

 

This paper develops a two-stage model for the optimal management of a potential invasive species. The arrival of an invasive species is modeled as an irreversible event with an uncertain arrival time. The model is solved in two stages, beginning with the post-invasion stage. Once the arrival occurs, the optimal path of species removal is that which minimizes the present value of damage and removal costs plus the expected present value of prevention costs. An expenditure-dependent, conditional hazard rate describing species arrival is developed based on discussions with natural resource managers. We solve for the optimal sequence of prevention expenditures, given the minimum invasion penalty as just described. For the case of the Brown Tree Snake potentially invading Hawaii, we find that pre-invasion expenditures on prevention are inverse U-shaped in the hazard rate. Efficient prevention should be approximately $2.9million today and held constant until invasion. Once invasion occurs, optimal prevention requires $3.1million annually and $1.6million per year on species removal to keep the population at its steady state level, due to high search costs at very small population levels.

Published: Burnett, K., S. Pongkijvorasin, and J. Roumasset. "Species Invasion as Catastrophe: The Case of the Brown Tree Snake," Environmental and Resource Economics, 51:241-254, doi:10.1007/s10640-011-9497-3.

 


KITV Project Economy: Explaining The Council On Revenues

Posted January 6, 2012 | Categories: Media

Jill Kuramoto interviews UHERO Executive Director and Associate Professor of Economics Carl Bonham.

  • The council on revenues met yesterday and lowered its forecast for State Tax Revenues for 2012. How much was the revision, and why did you lower the forecast?
  • A forecast of 11.5% growth still seems very strong. Is our economy really doing that well?
  • What was the good news for the national economy?

Watch Q / A


KITV Project Economy: How The Payroll Tax Impacts Hawaii

Posted December 16, 2011 | Categories: Media

Mahealani Richardson interviews UHERO Research Fellow and Professor of Economics Sumner Lacroix.

  • How will the payroll tax cut affect us?
  • Congress is looking at extending unemployment benefits - what does that mean for the unemployment rate, and for people still looking for work?
  • Is the busy holiday retail season a sign that there could be better things in the future?

Watch


KITV Project Economy: Why Are The Hawaii Rich Getting Richer

Posted December 9, 2011 | Categories: Media

Mahealani Richardson interviews UHERO Research Fellow and Professor of Economics Sumner Lacroix.

  • What do the numbers tell us about income inequality?
  • What share of income goes to the rich and uber-rich (the top 10%)?
  • Why is there an income disparity?

Watch Q / A


KITV Project Economy: UHERO Releases New Asia Pacific Forecast

Posted December 2, 2011 | Categories: Media

Mahealani Richardson interviews UHERO Forecast Project Director and Professor of Economics Byron Gangnes.

  • Are moods improving with the economy?
  • What does your Asia-Pacific report include?
  • What are the long-range issues and impacts in that region from natural disasters like the tsunami in Japan?

Watch


UHERO Asia-Pacific Forecast: Hawaii in the Asia-Pacific Century

The Asia-Pacific region will see further incremental slowing in the near term, due to headwinds from struggling Western economies. Longer term, several key trends will shape the pattern of growth in the region, including lingering aftereffects of the Japanese quake, population aging in Korea and other Asian economies, the vulnerability of emerging countries to developed economy shocks, and the challenge China faces in moving to a consumer society. These issues will have implications for Hawaii tourism and for local policymaking in coming years.

This report represents the first UHERO Asia-Pacific Forecast, a regionally focused report that replaces the broader Global Forecast we have prepared in past years. The Asia-Pacific Forecast reviews conditions and prospects for key countries within the region. For this maiden edition, we have also enlisted the help of an international team of scholars to provide expert analysis of key longer-term issues for regional economies and Hawaii.

public summarysubscribe


KITV Project Economy: Super Committee With Super Deadline

Posted November 18, 2011 | Categories: Media

Mahealani Richardson interviews UHERO Executive Director and Associate Professor of Economics Carl Bonham.

  • What exactly is the super committee?
  • It sounds like the exact same thing that Congress was in last summer - are they in the same 'rut', essentially?
  • What happens if they don't reach this deadline?

Watch


Page: 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19